Agar.io: Playing as Antitrust Enforcer

Some of you may know that I play a lot of Agar.io. For those of who you who don’t: here’s my Twitch. I play as “2048” on FFA and Experimental and as “higgs boson” on Teams.

Some people like to form teams even while playing on FFA (free-for-all), since this gives them safety, makes rising easier, and of course, it’s fun to have friends. Many do this explicitly by using nicknames in the likes of “W = friend”, but many who don’t even have such names play as a team anyway.

I consider the forming of teams (at least, long-term teams) in FFA unsportsmanlike, for one thing because there is a dedicated mode for Team play, and for another thing because even a two-player team that has reached incredible size can become practically invincible. In particular, when a team has enough mass, an iterating pattern that continues to increase the mass within the pair in an upwards spiral is for one blob to max-divide in a way that just consumes some non-team blob and feed most parts to the other blob in the team, and then reverse the process in the opposite direction, counteracting both the rapid rate of decay when large and the vulnerability of being divided into many blobs. (Note that this can’t be used in the actual Teams mode: players on the same team in Teams mode cannot consume each other, so a winning team in FFA is actually more excessively powerful than a winning team in Teams.) Such a team need not even fear viruses, because this iteration quickly solves the problem of many little blobs; if anything, viruses are desired by such a team playing optimally, as viruses are actually quite some value in mass for their ease of consumption. Usually, such a binary system only ends when one partner accidentally swallows all the parts of the other, and the source of mass transfer is lost, at which point often the other partner meets a swift downfall, their size massively out of proportion for their individual skill.

Because teams abuse can be so game-breaking and I have much more respect for individual skill and acuity, I have moved towards a playing style where I (1) restrain myself from having significant team-style playing in FFA and (2) actively play to make it harder for players that have decided to embrace a teams style of play in FFA.

Continue reading “Agar.io: Playing as Antitrust Enforcer”

Advertisements

A Game of Agar.io

I decided to graph out the mass of my blobs through a game of Agar.io, specifically this one. The blue bar at the bottom represents the size of my largest blob, the red bar above it my second largest blob, the yellow bar above that my third largest blob, and so on.

agariograph

Unfortunately, some estimation had to be done at certain times when the mass of the blob is occluded or when a blob is too small in comparison to other of my blobs for me to be able to resolve its size. In these cases, I sometimes extrapolated from surrounding certain data (often what I did when the mass was occluded), and sometimes used a ruler to make a size estimate.