US Presidential Election Spiciness Tiers

🌶🌶🌶🌶🌶 Tier

2016
1876
1872

🌶🌶🌶🌶 Tier

2000
1968
1860
1832
1824
1800

🌶🌶🌶 Tier

1992
1976
1972
1960
1948
1912
1856
1828

🌶🌶 Tier

2004
1996
1984
1980
1964
1932
1892
1852
1848
1836
1796
1789

🌶 Tier

2008
1988
1956
1928
1924
1908
1900
1896
1888
1884
1880
1868
1864
1844
1840
1820
1808
1804

Mild Tier

2012
1952
1944
1940
1936
1920
1916
1904
1816
1812
1792

I would predict the coming election to be a 🌶🌶🌶🌶 election.

US Representative Apportionment, but Performed upon the Countries of the World

What if the world had a representative body among the countries that operated on the apportionment rules of the US House of Representatives?

The following map shows the distribution of representatives to UN-recognized countries from running the Huntington-Hill algorithm for an assembly of 1650 representatives. (I arrived at 1650 via scaling extrapolation from the number of entities represented (not population) for the US House.) Each representative represents approximately 4.7 million people.

world_huntington_hill

Slightly less than half the world’s countries get allotted 1 representative. Taiwan is not recognized by the UN, but Taiwan would have 5 representatives upon inclusion. Hong Kong, if included, would have 2 representatives.

These reduced numbers could be helpful for remembering ballpark relative populations of countries.

Highway System Directional Orientation Exceptions

The Interstate Highway System, the US Highway System, and the California State Highway System are all systems in which (primary) highways are numbered with odd numbers if they are north-south routes and even numbers if they are east-west routes. In many schemes, though, there are exceptions, and parity of highway number is no exception. In the below chart, I color each highway in these systems green if the parity of the highway number correctly tells the highway’s dominant orientation, and red if it fails to.

highway_orientation

Note that I didn’t bother to indicate this for Interstate and US highways numbered above 99 and 101 respectively, as those numbers are explicitly reserved for a different numbering schematic. I also parenthesized several highways to indicate similar and other reasons the highways shouldn’t be counted in this analysis.

I also chose to use “SN” and “WE” to indicate highway direction, contrary to the English-established phrases “north-south” and “east-west” to instead reflect the direction of conventional mileage indication and exit numbering.

Continue reading “Highway System Directional Orientation Exceptions”

Map of US Representatives’ Endorsements in the Democratic Primary

This map colors the 68 US congressional districts for which the representative of the district has already endorsed a candidate for the upcoming Democratic primary election. It does not include endorsements for candidates that have received congressional endorsements but have already dropped out of the race, of which there were three: Jay Inslee, Kirsten Gillibrand, and Eric Swalwell.

representatives_endorsements_1026

This map was created using mapchart.

Reranking the >25 Democratic Candidates

(update to this post, factoring in the change in my opinions over the past three months)

  1. Bernie Sanders (=)
  2. Tulsi Gabbard (=)
  3. Jay Inslee (dropped out) (=)
  4. Mike Gravel (dropped out) (=)
  5. Elizabeth Warren (=)
  6. Cory Booker (+5)
  7. Andrew Yang (-1)
  8. Amy Klobuchar (=)
  9. Michael Bennet (+4)
  10. Steve Bullock (+2)
  11. John Hickenlooper (dropped out) (-1)
  12. Joe Biden (-3)
  13. Seth Moulton (dropped out) (+1)
  14. Kamala Harris (-7)
  15. Tom Steyer (new)
  16. John Delaney (+2)
  17. Tim Ryan (-1)
  18. Joe Sestak (-1)
  19. Wayne Messam (+2)
  20. Bill de Blasio (dropped out) (=)
  21. Julian Castro (-2)
  22. Eric Swalwell (dropped out) (+2)
  23. Marianne Williamson (=)
  24. Kirsten Gillibrand (dropped out) (-2)
  25. Beto O’Rourke (=)
  26. Pete Buttigieg (=)

Not too bad of a distribution of dropping out correlating with my dispreference, but not too good either.